AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Review Recap

Introduction

On November 5, 2020, the 7nm Zen 3 AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop CPUs actually went on sale. There are four SKUs in the initial release. The review embargo for these processors also expired on November 5, so there are a LOT of written and video reviews available now. This post will be an AMD Ryzen 5000 Series review recap.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Review Recap
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Box

I was able to get a Ryzen 5 5600X at the Denver Micro Center just by getting in a fairly long line about 15 minutes before they opened. If I had gotten there perhaps 10-15 minutes earlier, I would have been able to get a Ryzen 7 5800X if I had wanted.

I was not too upset about that, since I think the 5800X is the least interesting SKU of the four. This is just because of the pricing/core compared to the other three SKUs. There is nothing wrong with the performance of the 5800X.

The high-level specifications for these four initial SKUs are shown below. I wrote a post that had some more information when these were announced on October 8th.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Processors

Written Reviews

Here are some of the better, written reviews of these processors. As you can probably tell from the titles, the reviews are very positive.

Video Reviews

Here are some of the better video reviews of these processors on YouTube. The general consensus is that these new AMD Ryzen 5000 processors pretty much beat anything Intel has to offer, in nearly every workload.

Final Words

Personally, I think two of these SKUs really stand out for different use cases. If gaming is your primary focus, then the 6C/12T Ryzen 5 5600X seems like the best choice. It is relatively affordable at $299, so you can spend more of your budget on your GPU. Very few current games actually use more than 4-6 CPU cores, and you are more likely to be GPU limited at higher resolutions.

If productivity is your main focus, then the 12C/24T Ryzen 9 5900X seems like the best choice. It gives you twelve physical cores for only $100 more than the 8C/16T Ryzen 7 5800X. This SKU is also a bargain compared to the 16C/32T Ryzen 9 5950X, which costs $250 more for those four extra cores.

There is certainly nothing wrong with any of these four SKUs. It really just comes down to your budget and what you plan on doing with your system.

I have Amazon Affiliate links for the entire Ryzen 5000 series here. I can’t promise they are all in stock though…

I have already bought a Ryzen 5 5600X for gaming (which will replace a 3600XT) and I am planning on getting a Ryzen 9 5950X for my main workstation (when I can find one). The 5950X will replace a 3950X.

If you have any questions about this post, please ask me here in the comments or on Twitter. I am pretty active on Twitter as GlennAlanBerry. Thanks for reading!

Categories AMD, PC Hardware

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